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aglets & ampersands

(words in an order and some other things)

my-ear-trumpet:

patchyhero:

Joshua Norton, First Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico. No shit.

my-ear-trumpet:

patchyhero:

Joshua Norton, First Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico. No shit.

my-ear-trumpet:

boydjones:

clingtomymouth:

girlperson:

Here’s what happens: you’re poring over Derrida and then you decide to type his name into Google Image search and poof, here we are.

my-ear-trumpet:

boydjones:

clingtomymouth:

girlperson:

Here’s what happens: you’re poring over Derrida and then you decide to type his name into Google Image search and poof, here we are.

Not that Pierre Gringoire either feared the cardinal or despised him. He had neither that weakness nor that arrogance. A true eclectic, as he would nowadays be called, Gringoire had one of those steady and elevated minds, calm and temperate, which can reserve their composure under all circumstances, stare in dimidio rerum [“Stay within the mean”]. It was one of those minds which are full of reason and liberal philosophy, but at the same time, that are respectful to cardinals. An admirable and uninterrupted race of philosophers, to whom Wisdom, like another Ariadne, seems to have given a ball of thread which they have gone on unwinding from the beginning of the world through the whole labyrinth of human affairs. Hey are to be found in all times, and ever the same — that is to say, ever adapting themselves to the age. And not to mention our Pierre Gringoire, who would be heir representative in the fifteenth century, if we could succeed in obtaining him the distinction which he deserves. It was certainly that spirit which inspired Father du Breul in the sixteenth, when writing these words of sublime simplicity, worthy of any age: “I am a Parisian by my birthplace, and a Parrhisian by my speech, for parrhisia in Greek means freedom of speech, which freedom I have used even to messeigneurs the cardinals, uncle and brother to Monseigneur the Prince of Conti, albeit with respect for their greatness, and without offending anyone in their train, and that is saying much.”

—Victor Hugo, The Hunchback of Notre-Dame

my-ear-trumpet:

missfolly:

Steampunk Rabbit Hunt
What is quite curious about this scene is the absolute absence of fear in the rabbit. Through the powers of Interpolative Reasoning, methinks the Steampunks have fallen witlessly into a cleverly contrived trap. One should never underestimate a rabbit.

my-ear-trumpet:

missfolly:

Steampunk Rabbit Hunt

What is quite curious about this scene is the absolute absence of fear in the rabbit. Through the powers of Interpolative Reasoning, methinks the Steampunks have fallen witlessly into a cleverly contrived trap. One should never underestimate a rabbit.

I am the man who comes and goes between the bar and the telephone booth. Or rather: that man is called “I” and you know nothing else about him, just as this station is called only “station” and thre exists nothing beyond it except the unanswered signal of a telephone ringing in a dark room of a distant city.

—Italo Calvino, If on a winter’s night a traveller

my-ear-trumpet:

chateauxdanslair:

Sir Juan Carlos Antonio  Galliano Guillén, book costume
 “Costuming yourself as a book is wonderful  for the literary minded. You can spend the evening with your pages  romantically fluttering in the wind and your dust jacket can serve as a  makeshift bib at the buffet table. Another advantage to this costume is  if the night gets truly dull you can always go home and read yourself…”

my-ear-trumpet:

chateauxdanslair:

Sir Juan Carlos Antonio Galliano Guillén, book costume


“Costuming yourself as a book is wonderful for the literary minded. You can spend the evening with your pages romantically fluttering in the wind and your dust jacket can serve as a makeshift bib at the buffet table. Another advantage to this costume is if the night gets truly dull you can always go home and read yourself…”

liquidnight:

Holland  House Library after an air raid, Kensington, London, 1940
Photographer unknown
“Consider the well-known photograph taken of Holland House in London of September 1940, the morning after a German air raid had devastated the house, but had somehow left the library walls, with their shelves of neatly arranged books, mostly intact. This was the period of the Blitz, when the German Luftwaffe bombed London and other English cities continuously for months, hoping to make Britain vulnerable to a land invasion. Holland House, the remnants of which now form part of an open-air theater, was built in 1605 for Sir Walter Cope. It was one of the first “great houses” of Kensington, and during England’s Civil War it was occupied by Cromwell’s army.
The photograph shows three men in bowler hats who appear quite comfortable, even calm, as they browse and select books from the tidy stacks, while all around them lie the bombed-out ruins of the house, its roof smashed to pieces, its charred beams exposed, ladders and chairs and other assorted pieces of furniture crushed under the rubble. But the browsers appear oblivious to the terrors of the night before and the chaos surrounding them on all sides. They are the very image of scholarly repose, of quiet study and reflective contemplation, and the symmetry of the books and shelves are the very picture of order in the midst of disorder. Outside, but also inside, lies a world on the brink of apocalypse, what Churchill called “the abyss of a new dark age”
—Eileen A. Joy, Postcard from the Volcano: Beowulf, Memory, History
[photo via Fantomatik]

liquidnight:

Holland House Library after an air raid, Kensington, London, 1940

Photographer unknown

“Consider the well-known photograph taken of Holland House in London of September 1940, the morning after a German air raid had devastated the house, but had somehow left the library walls, with their shelves of neatly arranged books, mostly intact. This was the period of the Blitz, when the German Luftwaffe bombed London and other English cities continuously for months, hoping to make Britain vulnerable to a land invasion. Holland House, the remnants of which now form part of an open-air theater, was built in 1605 for Sir Walter Cope. It was one of the first “great houses” of Kensington, and during England’s Civil War it was occupied by Cromwell’s army.

The photograph shows three men in bowler hats who appear quite comfortable, even calm, as they browse and select books from the tidy stacks, while all around them lie the bombed-out ruins of the house, its roof smashed to pieces, its charred beams exposed, ladders and chairs and other assorted pieces of furniture crushed under the rubble. But the browsers appear oblivious to the terrors of the night before and the chaos surrounding them on all sides. They are the very image of scholarly repose, of quiet study and reflective contemplation, and the symmetry of the books and shelves are the very picture of order in the midst of disorder. Outside, but also inside, lies a world on the brink of apocalypse, what Churchill called “the abyss of a new dark age”

Eileen A. Joy, Postcard from the Volcano: Beowulf, Memory, History

[photo via Fantomatik]

fuckyeahcondiments:

Severed Hand Salt and Pepper Shakers. An “ewwwsome” way to increase your salt intake. Creepy reverse-palm shot here.

fuckyeahcondiments:

Severed Hand Salt and Pepper Shakers. An “ewwwsome” way to increase your salt intake. Creepy reverse-palm shot here.

Nº. 1 of  4